Summary

Religion Baha’i

Basic Beliefs They Believe that 9 religions are paths to God, and that thiers is the faster path. Tithing, prayer, fasting and work are all part of thier worship. They believe there are Messengers of God who come down to help speard his word, the most recent being Bahá’u’lláh who also started the faith.Three core principles establish a basis for Bahá’í teachings and doctrine: the unity of God, the unity of religion, and the unity of humankind. From these postulates stems the belief that God periodically reveals his will through divine messengers, whose purpose is to transform the character of humankind and develop, within those who respond, moral and spiritual qualities. Religion is thus seen as orderly, unified, and progressive from age to age.

Deities Worshipped Monothestic religion.

Founded mid 19th Centery in Persia

Scared Texts Kitab-i-Aqbas,Gleanings from the Writings of Bahá’u’lláh, Prayers and Meditations, Epistle to the Son of Wolf, The Seven Valleys and the Four Valleys

Celebrations

Naw-Rúz is an ancient Iranian New Years day festival which occurs near the Spring Equinox. It is now a world holiday of the Baha’i faith. If the equinox occurs before sunset, then New Year’s Day is celebrated on that day in the Middle East; otherwise it is delayed until the following day. In the rest of the world, it is on Mar-21. It is celebrated with many symbols indicating regrowth and renewal – much like the Christian Easter. Some members follow the ancient Iranian “haft-sin” custom on this day involves arranging seven objects whose name begin with the letter S in Persian; e.g. hyacinths, apples, lilies, silver coins, garlic, vinegar and rue.

Ridvan (also known as the Most Great Festival and King of Festivals) is celebrated on April 21. It is a 12 day celebration which recalls the time when Baha’u’llah declared that he was the prophet predicted by the Bab. It is the most holy days of the Baha’i year.

Declaration of the Bab occurs on May-23 each year. It recalls the day in 1844 CE when the Bab declared that he was the individual to make way for Baha’u’llah.

Ascension of Baha’u’llah is celebrated on May 29, the anniversary of Baha’u’llah’s death.

Martyrdom of the Bab is on July 9, the date when the Bab was executed.

Birth of the Bab is recognized on October 20, the birthday of the Bab.

Birth of Baha’u’llah is on November 12, the birthday of Baha’u’llah.

Day of the Covenant is on November 26; it recognizes the day that Baha’u’llah’s son Abdul-Baha became the Center of the Covenant.

Ascension of Abdu’l-Baha is on November 28; it recalls the death of Abdul-Baha.

Afterlife  Bahá’ís believe in an afterlife in which the soul is separated from the body. At death, according to the Bahá’í faith, the soul begins a spiritual journey towards God through many planes of existence. Progress on this journey towards God is likened to the idea of “heaven.” If the soul fails to develop, one remains distant from God. This condition of remoteness from God can in some sense be understood as “hell.” Thus Bahá’ís do not regard heaven and hell as literal places but as different states of being during one’s spiritual journey toward or away from God. Bahá’ís understand the spiritual world to be a timeless and placeless extension of our own universe–and not some physically remote or removed place. But beyond this, the exact nature of the afterlife remains a mystery. Bahá’u’lláh wrote, “The nature of the soul after death can never be described.”

Places of Worship Bahá’í Houses of Worship as spiritual gathering places for prayer and meditation round which will cluster social, humanitarian, educational, and scientific institutions. This conception exemplifies the broad context in which the worship of God, according to the Bahá’í teachings, is to be expressed. So far, seven Houses of Worship have been built, on a continental basis.

Cultural Impact when they first started in Persia they were met with hate and persucution. Now it seems they have made it to mainstream

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: