Baha’i Holy days

I still cannot claim to be even close to understanding this religion. Holy days usually give insight into what makes people happy and what is important in their lives, if this is true then these days really do……….

The Baha’i calender works much different from our own, they have 19 months with 19 days each with an extra period between the 18th and 19th month called Intercalary Days. The 19th month of the calender is devoted completely to fasting, anyone between the ages of 15-70 will go 19 days without food or drink. They do this to spiritually prepare and regenerate for the new year. Exemptions for illness, pregnancy, nursing mothers, extended travel and arduous physical labor are made.

9 seems to be a reoccurring theme in the religion. There are 9 holy days they celebrate. They have 19 days in 19 months. Baha’u’llah was the 9th prophet. And they claim to combine 9 major religions. Wheather this is done on purpose I couldn’t find the answer yet.

This is a list of thier Holy days taken directly form thier website www.bahai.org/

Baha’i Holy Days and Commemorative Days

World Religion Day (Third Sunday in January): The day is devoted to proclaiming the oneness of religion and the belief that world religion will unify the peoples of the earth. The Baha’i-sponsored observance was established in 1950 by the Baha’is of the United States.

Ayyam-i-ha or Intercalary Days (Feb. 26-March 1): Ayyam-i-ha, or “Days of Ha,” are devoted to spiritual preparation for the Fast, celebrating, hospitality, charity and gift giving. They are celebrated the four days (five in leap year) before the last month of the Baha’i year.

Naw-Rúz (March 21): The Baha’i New Year’s Day coincides with the spring equinox. Naw-Ruz is an ancient Persian festival celebrating the “new day” and for Baha’is it marks the end of the annual 19-Day Fast and is one of the nine holy days of the year when work is suspended.

Festival of Ridvan (April 21-May 2): The annual Baha’i festival commemorates the 12 days (April 21-May 2, 1863) when Baha’u’llah, the founder of the Baha’i Faith, resided in a garden called Ridvan (Paradise) in Baghdad, Iraq. At this time He publicly proclaimed His mission as God’s messenger for this age. The first (April 21), ninth (April 29) and twelfth (May 2) days are celebrated as holy days when work is suspended.

Declaration of the Bab (May 23): The Baha’i commemorates the day in 1844, when the Bab, the herald of the Baha’i Faith, announced in Shiraz, Persia (now Iran), that he was the herald of a new messenger of God. It is one of the nine holy days of the year when work is suspended.

Ascension of Baha’u’llah (May 29): Baha’is observe the anniversary of the death in exile of Baha’u’llah, the founder of the Baha’i Faith, on May 29, 1892, outside Akko (also known as Akka or Acre), in what is now northern Israel. It is one of the nine holy days of the year where work is suspended.

Race Unity Day (Second Sunday in June): The Baha’i-sponsored observance promotes racial harmony and understanding and the essential unity of humanity. It was established in 1957 by the Baha’is of the U.S.

Martyrdom of the Bab (July 9): The holy day commemorates the anniversary of the execution of the Bab (Siyyid ‘Ali-Muhammad), the herald of the Baha’i Faith, by a firing squad on July 9, 1850, in Tabriz, Persia (now Iran). It is one of the nine holy days of the year when work is suspended.

Birth of the Bab (Oct. 20): The day is an observance of the anniversary of the birth on Oct. 20, 1819, in Shiraz, Persia (now Iran), of Siyyid ‘Ali-Muhammad, who later took the title of “the Bab,” meaning “the Gate.” The Bab was the herald of the Baha’i Faith. The day is one of the nine holy days of the year when work is suspended.

Birth of Baha’u’llah (Nov. 12): Baha’is observe the anniversary of the birth of Baha’u’llah (born Mirza Husayn-‘Ali) on Nov. 12, 1817, in Tehran, Persia (now Iran). Baha’u’llah, which means the “Glory of God,” is the founder of the Baha’i Faith. It is one of the nine holy days of the year when work is suspended.

Day of the Covenant (Nov. 26): The festival commemorates Baha’u’llah’s appointment of his eldest son, ‘Abdu’l-Baha, as the Center of His Covenant.

Ascension of ‘Abdu’l-Baha (Nov 28): Baha’is observe the anniversary of the death of ‘Abdu’l-Baha, son of Baha’u’llah and His appointed succesor, on Nov 28, 1921 in Haifa, in what is now northern Israel.

Hope this is helping someone!

Blessings
Lucy

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2 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Laura on December 2, 2010 at 7:01 am

    Hi Lucy! I was interested to stumble across your blog. May I, as a Baha’i, offer a slight correction to the info above? In regard to our yearly fast, we abstain from food and drink from sunrise to sunset, for 19 days. Generally, Baha’is rise before dawn during the fast, for breakfast, and then break the fast after sunset, often in a social atmosphere with lots of other people. And of course, the exemptions you mentioned are observed. A couple of the goals driving this process are: to have a period of intense prayer and reflection on God and our spiritual journey (being hungry is a potent reminder when our intentions stray!); to experience the suffering of the poor and hungry so our empathy and action on their behalf will be increased.

    Blessings to you on your journey! Feel free to email me if you would like to ask any questions.
    Laura

    Reply

    • Thank you so much! And that makes alot more sense now because all the info I found just mentioned Fasting the whole 19 days! Right now I am on to a different religion but I know in January I am going to visit a temple(?) and I’m sure I’ll have a lot more questions then and will take you up on that offer! Thanks again!

      Reply

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